When is a bigger profile better?

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Im trying to get a better grasp on bass' seasonal behaviors. I know this can vary depening on what the fish want that day but...when is it better to throw a plastic with more appendages such as a brush hog or some sort of creature bait compared to a craw or a tube etc etc.?
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My take: if you suspect that more appendages are a plus, why not just go to a jig and trailer? There are probably over a thousand soft plastic designs (Lurecraft sells molds duplicating at least 300) and in my experience covering over 45 years of fishing, soft plastics come in two categories: those that are stream lined and finesse in action and those that are wider and bulkier resulting in a more extreme action on the fall. Even the Brush Hog is streamlined regardless of the double curly tails.

Appendages IMO are overrated especially on lizards. The plastic lizard is more or less a plastic worm with curly tail shaped a bit different in body than a plastic worm. But take the Ugly Otter or Houdini Shad and the profile is only a small part of those bait's attraction - the horizontal wobble (like that of the Senko) and slow fall, IMO, seal the deal of an action-attraction complemented by body shape.

Action always speaks louder along with presentation and pretty much defines the type of fishing required by the conditions I encounter. Sometimes more finesse/ sometimes more extreme action. Sometimes a wider lipped crankbait with more extreme action is better than a Rat L Trap and vice versa. Even color falls into those two categories: bright/ flashing = extreme contrast; muted colors = finesse.

Again, I'm not a prey matching believer and no way think a bass thinks a lizard is a lizard or a worm is a worm. Lure actions are what triggers strikes just like a bull charging a cape, minus the emotion of anger - a thought process fish are incapable of.
Lure magnetism comes in different forms, any one of which may be the best, but usually a number of lures could work in that moment in my experience if active fish or certain conditions are encountered.

Just one other way of looking at why predator fish (bass, crappie, perch) are attracted to a foreign object entering its space and then drawn even closer to consider mouthing a lure.
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>soyIm trying to get a better grasp on bass' seasonal behaviors. I know this can vary depening on what the fish want that day but...when is it better to throw a plastic with more appendages such as a brush hog or some sort of creature bait compared to a craw or a tube etc etc.?

Posts: 61
Thank you received: 1
offline
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My take: if you suspect that more appendages are a plus, why not just go to a jig and trailer? There are probably over a thousand soft plastic designs (Lurecraft sells molds duplicating at least 300) and in my experience covering over 45 years of fishing, soft plastics come in two categories: those that are stream lined and finesse in action and those that are wider and bulkier resulting in a more extreme action on the fall. Even the Brush Hog is streamlined regardless of the double curly tails.

Appendages IMO are overrated especially on lizards. The plastic lizard is more or less a plastic worm with curly tail shaped a bit different in body than a plastic worm. But take the Ugly Otter or Houdini Shad and the profile is only a small part of those bait's attraction - the horizontal wobble (like that of the Senko) and slow fall, IMO, seal the deal of an action-attraction complemented by body shape.

Action always speaks louder along with presentation and pretty much defines the type of fishing required by the conditions I encounter. Sometimes more finesse/ sometimes more extreme action. Sometimes a wider lipped crankbait with more extreme action is better than a Rat L Trap and vice versa. Even color falls into those two categories: bright/ flashing = extreme contrast; muted colors = finesse.

Again, I'm not a prey matching believer and no way think a bass thinks a lizard is a lizard or a worm is a worm. Lure actions are what triggers strikes just like a bull charging a cape, minus the emotion of anger - a thought process fish are incapable of.
Lure magnetism comes in different forms, any one of which may be the best, but usually a number of lures could work in that moment in my experience if active fish or certain conditions are encountered.

Just one other way of looking at why predator fish (bass, crappie, perch) are attracted to a foreign object entering its space and then drawn even closer to consider mouthing a lure.soy