newbie to bass fishing

Forums
Hey yall, im new to bass fishing, ive attempted to catch bass for the past couple of years and im having no luck. I guess the main issue would be lack of knowledge on bass fishing baits, how to use them as well as locating them. I can catch them in ponds, but theres only one person letting me fish in their pond. Ive been trying lake fishing but Im just not doing something right. I dont have a boat so I have to bank fish. Any tips on baits that are fairly easy to use and help me catch a few bass would be appreciated. Also how to use the bait would be great along with helping me locate them. Sorry for so many needed tips but youtube bass tips keep costing me money and producing no fish. Thanks guys.
Posts: 433
Thank you received: 69
offline
User

Hey Edward....Welcome rto the forum.... 😃 . There are a few guys on here , i'm sure can help you out..I probably dont know any more than you do as far as lake fishing goes...I do fairly well river fishing for Smallmouth...?

Jessica has given you really good advice,i use to fish from bank a lot.as the water warms you can a lot of times step out just knee deep from bank and make parelell cast with bank stayin in the zone longer.just be careful and watch what your doing!!
when it gets hot ive even wade out past my waist but you need to know the bottom youre fishing!I like texas rigged worms from bank because they work and youll lose more tackle from bank.worms aren't so high compared to a crankbait.spinner baits aren't too bad and work well sometime.also surface lures are good.
Posts: 47
Thank you received: 9
offline
Moderator

All good responses here. Welcome to 1 Source. You will need to make sure to consider line size depending on water clarity. Sometimes a search type bait like a rattle trap can help you locate fish. That's 90 % of the challenge. Lots of people feel like under low light conditions the bass will pull off of cover and roam around. On bright sunny days the bass tend to be positioned near or next or under a piece of cover that provides shade. there are a lot of theories as to why this is but the main thing is to realize that seems to make the bass a bit more predictable. If you are fishing a location with a fairly clean bottom you might also locate some fish with a Carolina rig. Remember bass like to be shallow so when bank fishing always approach in a stealthy way.
Posts: 3
Thank you received: 0
offline
User

Hi Edward,

I like to fish weeds with rubber worms. Get a worm hook (they have a bend in them for hooking weedless) buy yourself some rubber worms (I like Havoc brand) and thread them on the hook so that to top bend is in the head of the worm the body of the hook is out of the worm and the point of the hook is just in the body of the worm just covering the barb of the hook. This way you can throw the lure in any weeds and not get caught up. I'll try to post a picture later. You have to careful because sometimes when a bass takes it you will just feel a tick on the line. I kind of very easily take up the slack and try to feel if the fish is there. If it is set the hook hard. Now sometimes pan fish will take it by the tail and move it out of their area. You will have to learn the difference. You can tell by the feel. If you try to set the hook on them you will not get them and sometimes you'll loose the tail of the worm. It may sound difficult but it's fun and once you learn it's very rewarding. I'll have to take a photo later and post it for you to show you what the rig looks like. The best of luck to you!
Bob


Bass.jpg

Posts: 3
Thank you received: 0
offline
User

Sorry! I don't know why the image came out side ways.
Bob
Posts: 3
Thank you received: 0
offline
User

Here's the way I rig a rubber worm. I don't use any weight. Hopefully you can see what I'm talking about.

wormrig.jpg

Posts: 70
Thank you received: 6
offline
Moderator

There has been many discussions about lure colors, lures that match a prey, lure action and size, presentations, line size, etc., but what we are really doing is finding all of the various ranges that we hope apply before we cast a lure. Ranges apply to each of the parts of the (educated?) guesses we make. Here are a few just off the top of my head (while trying to stay sane from the affects of cabin fever and avoid running naked in the snow. ) ^-^

Ranges regarding lures - here are a few:
Color range
Anyone who has used jigs and soft plastics knows that you don't need a truck load of colors. For me, black or pumpkin green jig skirts and trailers do the job - thus a small range/selection of colors is all I ever need. Same for plastic worms - a few colors will do 100% of the time. How many crankbait colors are ever needed? Five, a dozen, twenty? For me - three. Ditto for spinnerbaits and topwater lures.

Color brightness range - dark or light colored or maybe even clear
Colors are lighter or dark in appearance and again the range is (thankfully) small. Bright fluorescent colors also applies to flash (no color) as in silver Rat L Traps, spinnerbait blades and the sparkly glitter within soft plastics. Many of us know from experience what to use in dingy water or at night and the rule of thumb, a few will do .....does.

Lure action range
Lure action involves pressure waves, vibration/noise and slight to extreme motion. When the action is on top, we use lures that make noise or at least form a wake. The speed range of top water lures is limited - just the way we want it to be. No-lip crankbaits have a range more limited than lipped jerk baits or plugs which can be worked with a twitch, a steady jerk & pause, or steady and fast. We opt to chose the speed range for the conditions such as cold versus warm water, post frontal conditions, high versus low water, night fishing, etc. Interestingly, the slower the presentation, the less lure action preferred.

Lure depth range
Knowing how deep we want a lure to go and still be effective, we must know its range. You don't cast a large lipped deep diver in 4' just as you wouldn't cast a shallow diver in 15'. Suspending lures have a greater depth range; floating lures don't usually. One reason jigs and soft plastics are favored by many are their potential effective depth ranges. So in effect, we find the depth and use a limited number of lures that will work at that depth or depth range.

Lure speed range
Horizontal speed is a given, vertical drop speed another. Depth may determine drop speed and therefore weight range. Line diameter within a few pounds test are in a range that allows the best action horizontally or vertically.

Fish related ranges
Fish Depth
It rates number one as to where, how and what to use. In all likelihood the range isn't immense, but within four feet of the surface or the bottom. A known spot or area usually dictates a limited range of lures and presentations, as do the seasons and environmental conditions.

Fish cover - some areas, not others
Cover type falls within a limited range in specific areas (weeds, downed trees, stumps, pad fields) and the range of lure types may be limited, as is the range of presentations.

Fish activity range
How many of you routinely fish fast at the light of dawn or in cold water? The range of lures and presentations is limited if you use lures and presentations that match the activity you suspect. It can change by the hour, but once found, we stay within that range by getting a feel of how hard the hit, how often the strike and how long a lure has to be down to get struck.

Fish location range
It's been said that bass don't go far from a home area in their lifetimes which is less than a mile or so of where the eggs hatched. Seasonal locations are predictable and the range of location options depend on groups of bass that stay within certain areas. Some stay deeper, some shallower but their range of horizontal movement may only 20-30 yard annually or less than 10 vertical feet daily. It's also been said (B.Perry) that active fish are usually found within 10 % of a water's area, leaving 90% either containing no bass or less active bass because of flat featureless bottoms. There will always be exceptions to the general rule, but the waters I fish usually follow the rule of a limited range of areas to try.

I'm sure there are more ranges every angler considers, either by accident or conscientiously, but knowing those ranges can mean all the difference when it come to decisions made. For me, limiting the choices available, allows me to cut down on the amount of tackle and rods I carry (though I still wonder why so many experienced anglers tote around 30 lbs of tackle) . If I'm fishing the same water within 24 hours or for a few days and not much has changed, why waste time fishing unproductive areas or patterns?

The above may seem overwhelming to a newbie or one new to a lake that has no idea of the bottom, but getting to know a body of water over a few years and many outings, whittles down the ranges of where, when, and how and with what to catch fish. It's just a matter of knowing the limits of the ranges discussed - it makes fishing so much easier! 😜
Posts: 433
Thank you received: 69
offline
User

The only things i know about bank fishing..i learned from my brothers when i was younger..Dont wear bright colored clothes..they can see you. Step softly , and dont be moving around a whole lot, they can feel the vibrations in the water. Look for logs, rocks, close enough to cast to, or a point that disapears into the water. Docks are good when it gets hot, they will be sitting just inside the shade line, and will hide arond the posts, to try and ambush lunch. Buzzbaits around structure seem to work good in the early mornings. We would walk to the lake/river when the water level was low, and draw maps of where structure would be hidden once levels returned to normal (it was summer, we were bored...lol)..You might have already known that stuff...just trying to help.. 😃
Posts: 433
Thank you received: 69
offline
User

A point would be where the land extends out into the water, and will continue that trend below the surface, providing a ledge, or drop off. Hopefully some "real" fishermen will chime in here soon before i tell you something wrong (if its not too late...lol). On a large body of water, it is a big advantage to be in a boat, with a fish finder, so you can see all the ledges, drop offs, holes, etc. If you can get a topo map of the lake you want to fish, it might do you some good if there are elevation changes near the shore line.
Posts: 61
Thank you received: 1
offline
User

Search

 

USER ACCOUNT MENU

BREADCRUMB

  1. 1Source Home 
  2.  Forum 
  3.  Fishing 
  4.  Bass 
  5.  newbie to bass fishing

NEWBIE TO BASS FISHING

1Source Default User Picture

Submitted by Edward ClaxtonOn Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 00:27

Posts: 1

 

Thank you received: 0

 

offline

 

User

Hey yall, im new to bass fishing, ive attempted to catch bass for the past couple of years and im having no luck. I guess the main issue would be lack of knowledge on bass fishing baits, how to use them as well as locating them. I can catch them in ponds, but theres only one person letting me fish in their pond. Ive been trying lake fishing but Im just not doing something right. I dont have a boat so I have to bank fish. Any tips on baits that are fairly easy to use and help me catch a few bass would be appreciated. Also how to use the bait would be great along with helping me locate them. Sorry for so many needed tips but youtube bass tips keep costing me money and producing no fish. Thanks guys.

Thank you

Profile picture for user Jessica

Submitted by Jessica BalcoOn Thursday, May 1, 2014 - 16:45

Posts: 432

 

Thank you received: 69

 

offline

 

User

Permalink

 

Hey Edward....Welcome rto the forum.... 😃 . There are a few guys on here , i'm sure can help you out..I probably dont know any more than you do as far as lake fishing goes...I do fairly well river fishing for Smallmouth...?

Thank you

1Source Default User Picture

Submitted by Leland HerzogOn Friday, May 2, 2014 - 14:11

Posts: 8

 

Thank you received: 0

 

offline

 

User

Permalink

 

Jessica has given you really good advice,i use to fish from bank a lot.as the water warms you can a lot of times step out just knee deep from bank and make parelell cast with bank stayin in the zone longer.just be careful and watch what your doing!!
when it gets hot ive even wade out past my waist but you need to know the bottom youre fishing!I like texas rigged worms from bank because they work and youll lose more tackle from bank.worms aren't so high compared to a crankbait.spinner baits aren't too bad and work well sometime.also surface lures are good.

Thank you

1Source Default User Picture

Submitted by Steve MackeyOn Tuesday, May 6, 2014 - 05:59

Posts: 47

 

Thank you received: 9

 

offline

 

Moderator

Permalink

 

All good responses here. Welcome to 1 Source. You will need to make sure to consider line size depending on water clarity. Sometimes a search type bait like a rattle trap can help you locate fish. That's 90 % of the challenge. Lots of people feel like under low light conditions the bass will pull off of cover and roam around. On bright sunny days the bass tend to be positioned near or next or under a piece of cover that provides shade. there are a lot of theories as to why this is but the main thing is to realize that seems to make the bass a bit more predictable. If you are fishing a location with a fairly clean bottom you might also locate some fish with a Carolina rig. Remember bass like to be shallow so when bank fishing always approach in a stealthy way.

Thank you

Profile picture for user rutjr

Submitted by Bob ThomasOn Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 10:27

Posts: 3

 

Thank you received: 0

 

offline

 

User

Permalink

 

Hi Edward,

I like to fish weeds with rubber worms. Get a worm hook (they have a bend in them for hooking weedless) buy yourself some rubber worms (I like Havoc brand) and thread them on the hook so that to top bend is in the head of the worm the body of the hook is out of the worm and the point of the hook is just in the body of the worm just covering the barb of the hook. This way you can throw the lure in any weeds and not get caught up. I'll try to post a picture later. You have to careful because sometimes when a bass takes it you will just feel a tick on the line. I kind of very easily take up the slack and try to feel if the fish is there. If it is set the hook hard. Now sometimes pan fish will take it by the tail and move it out of their area. You will have to learn the difference. You can tell by the feel. If you try to set the hook on them you will not get them and sometimes you'll loose the tail of the worm. It may sound difficult but it's fun and once you learn it's very rewarding. I'll have to take a photo later and post it for you to show you what the rig looks like. The best of luck to you!
Bob


Bass.jpg

Thank you

Profile picture for user rutjr

Submitted by Bob ThomasOn Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 10:31

Posts: 3

 

Thank you received: 0

 

offline

 

User

Permalink

 

Sorry! I don't know why the image came out side ways.
Bob

Thank you

Profile picture for user rutjr

Submitted by Bob ThomasOn Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 12:57

Posts: 3

 

Thank you received: 0

 

offline

 

User

Permalink

 

Here's the way I rig a rubber worm. I don't use any weight. Hopefully you can see what I'm talking about.

wormrig.jpg

Thank you

Profile picture for user senkosam

Submitted by Frank ManueleOn Thursday, December 4, 2014 - 10:12

Posts: 70

 

Thank you received: 6

 

offline

 

Moderator

Permalink

 

There has been many discussions about lure colors, lures that match a prey, lure action and size, presentations, line size, etc., but what we are really doing is finding all of the various ranges that we hope apply before we cast a lure. Ranges apply to each of the parts of the (educated?) guesses we make. Here are a few just off the top of my head (while trying to stay sane from the affects of cabin fever and avoid running naked in the snow. ) ^-^

Ranges regarding lures - here are a few:
Color range
Anyone who has used jigs and soft plastics knows that you don't need a truck load of colors. For me, black or pumpkin green jig skirts and trailers do the job - thus a small range/selection of colors is all I ever need. Same for plastic worms - a few colors will do 100% of the time. How many crankbait colors are ever needed? Five, a dozen, twenty? For me - three. Ditto for spinnerbaits and topwater lures.

Color brightness range - dark or light colored or maybe even clear
Colors are lighter or dark in appearance and again the range is (thankfully) small. Bright fluorescent colors also applies to flash (no color) as in silver Rat L Traps, spinnerbait blades and the sparkly glitter within soft plastics. Many of us know from experience what to use in dingy water or at night and the rule of thumb, a few will do .....does.

Lure action range
Lure action involves pressure waves, vibration/noise and slight to extreme motion. When the action is on top, we use lures that make noise or at least form a wake. The speed range of top water lures is limited - just the way we want it to be. No-lip crankbaits have a range more limited than lipped jerk baits or plugs which can be worked with a twitch, a steady jerk & pause, or steady and fast. We opt to chose the speed range for the conditions such as cold versus warm water, post frontal conditions, high versus low water, night fishing, etc. Interestingly, the slower the presentation, the less lure action preferred.

Lure depth range
Knowing how deep we want a lure to go and still be effective, we must know its range. You don't cast a large lipped deep diver in 4' just as you wouldn't cast a shallow diver in 15'. Suspending lures have a greater depth range; floating lures don't usually. One reason jigs and soft plastics are favored by many are their potential effective depth ranges. So in effect, we find the depth and use a limited number of lures that will work at that depth or depth range.

Lure speed range
Horizontal speed is a given, vertical drop speed another. Depth may determine drop speed and therefore weight range. Line diameter within a few pounds test are in a range that allows the best action horizontally or vertically.

Fish related ranges
Fish Depth
It rates number one as to where, how and what to use. In all likelihood the range isn't immense, but within four feet of the surface or the bottom. A known spot or area usually dictates a limited range of lures and presentations, as do the seasons and environmental conditions.

Fish cover - some areas, not others
Cover type falls within a limited range in specific areas (weeds, downed trees, stumps, pad fields) and the range of lure types may be limited, as is the range of presentations.

Fish activity range
How many of you routinely fish fast at the light of dawn or in cold water? The range of lures and presentations is limited if you use lures and presentations that match the activity you suspect. It can change by the hour, but once found, we stay within that range by getting a feel of how hard the hit, how often the strike and how long a lure has to be down to get struck.

Fish location range
It's been said that bass don't go far from a home area in their lifetimes which is less than a mile or so of where the eggs hatched. Seasonal locations are predictable and the range of location options depend on groups of bass that stay within certain areas. Some stay deeper, some shallower but their range of horizontal movement may only 20-30 yard annually or less than 10 vertical feet daily. It's also been said (B.Perry) that active fish are usually found within 10 % of a water's area, leaving 90% either containing no bass or less active bass because of flat featureless bottoms. There will always be exceptions to the general rule, but the waters I fish usually follow the rule of a limited range of areas to try.

I'm sure there are more ranges every angler considers, either by accident or conscientiously, but knowing those ranges can mean all the difference when it come to decisions made. For me, limiting the choices available, allows me to cut down on the amount of tackle and rods I carry (though I still wonder why so many experienced anglers tote around 30 lbs of tackle) . If I'm fishing the same water within 24 hours or for a few days and not much has changed, why waste time fishing unproductive areas or patterns?

The above may seem overwhelming to a newbie or one new to a lake that has no idea of the bottom, but getting to know a body of water over a few years and many outings, whittles down the ranges of where, when, and how and with what to catch fish. It's just a matter of knowing the limits of the ranges discussed - it makes fishing so much easier! 😜

Thank you

Profile picture for user Jessica

Submitted by Jessica BalcoOn Thursday, May 1, 2014 - 18:52

Posts: 432

 

Thank you received: 69

 

offline

 

User

Permalink

 

The only things i know about bank fishing..i learned from my brothers when i was younger..Dont wear bright colored clothes..they can see you. Step softly , and dont be moving around a whole lot, they can feel the vibrations in the water. Look for logs, rocks, close enough to cast to, or a point that disapears into the water. Docks are good when it gets hot, they will be sitting just inside the shade line, and will hide arond the posts, to try and ambush lunch. Buzzbaits around structure seem to work good in the early mornings. We would walk to the lake/river when the water level was low, and draw maps of where structure would be hidden once levels returned to normal (it was summer, we were bored...lol)..You might have already known that stuff...just trying to help.. 😃

Thank you

Profile picture for user Jessica

Submitted by Jessica BalcoOn Friday, May 2, 2014 - 07:55

Posts: 432

 

Thank you received: 69

 

offline

 

User

Permalink

 

A point would be where the land extends out into the water, and will continue that trend below the surface, providing a ledge, or drop off. Hopefully some "real" fishermen will chime in here soon before i tell you something wrong (if its not too late...lol). On a large body of water, it is a big advantage to be in a boat, with a fish finder, so you can see all the ledges, drop offs, holes, etc. If you can get a topo map of the lake you want to fish, it might do you some good if there are elevation changes near the shore line.

Thank you

Add new commentsoy

Posts: 28
Thank you received: 0
offline
User

>Ranges regarding lures - here are a few:
Color range
Anyone who has used jigs and soft plastics knows that you don't need a truck load of colors. For me, black or pumpkin green jig skirts and trailers do the job - thus a small range/selection of colors is all I ever need. Same for plastic worms - a few colors will do 100% of the time. How many crankbait colors are ever needed? Five, a dozen, twenty? For me - three. Ditto for spinnerbaits and topwater lures.

Color brightness range - dark or light colored or maybe even clear
Colors are lighter or dark in appearance and again the range is (thankfully) small. Bright fluorescent colors also applies to flash (no color) as in silver Rat L Traps, spinnerbait blades and the sparkly glitter within soft plastics. Many of us know from experience what to use in dingy water or at night and the rule of thumb, a few will do .....does.

Lure action range
Lure action involves pressure waves, vibration/noise and slight to extreme motion. When the action is on top, we use lures that make noise or at least form a wake. The speed range of top water lures is limited - just the way we want it to be. No-lip crankbaits have a range more limited than lipped jerk baits or plugs which can be worked with a twitch, a steady jerk & pause, or steady and fast. We opt to chose the speed range for the conditions such as cold versus warm water, post frontal conditions, high versus low water, night fishing, etc. Interestingly, the slower the presentation, the less lure action preferred.

Lure depth range
Knowing how deep we want a lure to go and still be effective, we must know its range. You don't cast a large lipped deep diver in 4' just as you wouldn't cast a shallow diver in 15'. Suspending lures have a greater depth range; floating lures don't usually. One reason jigs and soft plastics are favored by many are their potential effective depth ranges. So in effect, we find the depth and use a limited number of lures that will work at that depth or depth range.

Lure speed range
Horizontal speed is a given, vertical drop speed another. Depth may determine drop speed and therefore weight range. Line diameter within a few pounds test are in a range that allows the best action horizontally or vertically.

Fish related ranges
Fish Depth
It rates number one as to where, how and what to use. In all likelihood the range isn't immense, but within four feet of the surface or the bottom. A known spot or area usually dictates a limited range of lures and presentations, as do the seasons and environmental conditions.

Fish cover - some areas, not others
Cover type falls within a limited range in specific areas (weeds, downed trees, stumps, pad fields) and the range of lure types may be limited, as is the range of presentations.

Fish activity range
How many of you routinely fish fast at the light of dawn or in cold water? The range of lures and presentations is limited if you use lures and presentations that match the activity you suspect. It can change by the hour, but once found, we stay within that range by getting a feel of how hard the hit, how often the strike and how long a lure has to be down to get struck.

Fish location range
It's been said that bass don't go far from a home area in their lifetimes which is less than a mile or so of where the eggs hatched. Seasonal locations are predictable and the range of location options depend on groups of bass that stay within certain areas. Some stay deeper, some shallower but their range of horizontal movement may only 20-30 yard annually or less than 10 vertical feet daily. It's also been said (B.Perry) that active fish are usually found within 10 % of a water's area, leaving 90% either containing no bass or less active bass because of flat featureless bottoms. There will always be exceptions to the general rule, but the waters I fish usually follow the rule of a limited range of areas to try.

I'm sure there are more ranges every angler considers, either by accident or conscientiously, but knowing those ranges can mean all the difference when it come to decisions made. For me, limiting the choices available, allows me to cut down on the amount of tackle and rods I carry (though I still wonder why so many experienced anglers tote around 30 lbs of tackle) . If I'm fishing the same water within 24 hours or for a few days and not much has changed, why waste time fishing unproductive areas or patterns?

The above may seem overwhelming to a newbie or one new to a lake that has no idea of the bottom, but getting to know a body of water over a few years and many outings, whittles down the ranges of where, when, and how and with what to catch fish. It's just a matter of knowing the limits of the ranges discussed - it makes fishing so much easier! 😜

hdfhh